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Hear George Strait sing “Amarillo By Morning” at a record breaking show

Hear George Strait sing “Amarillo By Morning” at a record breaking show

Hear George Strait sing “Amarillo By Morning” at a record breaking show

The record for the largest ticketed concert attendance in the United States stood for nearly fifty years when a 1977 Grateful Dead show drew 107,019 fans at Raceway Park in Englishtown, New Jersey. That record was broken on Saturday when George Strait, who previously held the record for the most for interior Concert attendance for the final night of his 2014 The Cowboy Rides Away Tour at AT&T Stadium in Arlington – surpassed the milestone held for the past 47 years by Jerry Garcia and Friends.

At Texas A&M’s Kyle Field in College Station, Strait topped both of his indoor meets and outdoor record by drawing 110,905 fans to what was billed as his only Texas show of the year. Record attendance for the stadium itself, including football matches, also fell in the process. But when you talk about George Strait, the numbers tend to be high in general. He’s had 44 number one hits on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart, celebrated his 72nd birthday last month and just released the first two singles from his 31st album, Cowboys and dreamerswhich will be released this fall.

Is 2024 shaping up to be the summer of the straits? In partial answer to that question, here are 110,905 fans singing “Amarillo by Morning” with King George.

It’s a rare feat for someone to break a ten-year concert attendance record after their farewell show, but Strait never promised to stop performing, just touring. The College Station show, officially called The King at Kyle Field, was his sixth since 2024 and is part of a string of one-off shows he’s done every year since the cowboy left (surprisingly for a semi-retired artist, he even had some dates from 2020 before the pandemic). Conroe native Parker McCollum celebrated his birthday by opening for Strait Saturday, putting him in excellent company. The King George always has top talent joining him on the bill at whatever stadium he goes to several times a year. This year, he was largely accompanied by Chris Stapleton, a megastar who joins Strait as a headliner, while fans were also treated to sets from Little Big Town, Willie Nelson and Carrie Underwood at concerts in recent years.

The show at Kyle Field may not have been as valuable as his show in Arlington a decade earlier, where Jason Aldean, Eric Church, Miranda Lambert and others joined him on stage at various times. But then, it doesn’t go away. Over the next few months, he has dates (with Stapleton and Little Big Town) in Salt Lake City, Detroit, Chicago and Las Vegas on the calendar. It’s more like he shakes when the mood strikes him. But he’s also at a point in his career where every night he plays has meaning. He told the crowd Saturday to expect to see him again. “Just invite me back,” he said, “I’ll come.” These days, every performance is a kind of victory lap, a tip of the hat from an artist with nothing to prove, giving fans in a stadium several hours of familiar songs to sing along to. Semi-retirement looks good on King George. Long may he reign.