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‘Symbol of bound kinship’: Singaporeans and Malaysians praise Causeway’s importance as highway celebrates 100 years

‘Symbol of bound kinship’: Singaporeans and Malaysians praise Causeway’s importance as highway celebrates 100 years

‘Symbol of bound kinship’: Singaporeans and Malaysians praise Causeway’s importance as highway celebrates 100 years

He also said that how much immigration processes have evolved over the years, both for the Singaporean and Malaysian authorities, reflects how much technology has advanced with the times.

“I remember when I was on duty we had to check the passports of arriving travelers with two thick books: one (which) listed those who were denied all (immigration) facilities, while the other had a list of immigrants blacklisted,” Mr. Ismail said. .

“Now it is more advanced, the scanning system is computerized and it is simpler and easier for the officers. It is convenient for travelers from Malaysia and Singapore, which means you don’t waste time waiting,” he added.

Mr Ismail reflected that through his interactions with Singaporean travelers on the Causeway, he felt there was mutual respect and understanding between the citizens of both countries.

“We respect them and they respect us, they’ve been cooperative and very nice to talk to,” he said.

“I believe in karma, if you’re a good officer and you’re polite, and people will respect you, what goes around comes around.”

A PIVOT BRIDGE FOR WORKERS, LEISURE TRAVELERS

In recent decades, the high volume of traffic on the Causeway can also be attributed to the hundreds of thousands of Malaysians who commute daily to work in Singapore and home in Johor Bahru.

The increasingly strong Singapore dollar against the Malaysian Ringgit over the years has led more Malaysians to cross the Johor Strait for work and a better living.

Among them is Mr Mohamad Radzi Zolkifli, a technical officer at SMRT, who commutes daily across the Causeway by motorbike between his home in Permas Jaya and his office in Tai Seng.

He told CNA that it takes him about two hours to travel each way during rush hour, meaning he spends a total of four hours stuck in transit on most days.